Free and Friendly Foods Ice Cream Sundae

Ice Cream Sundae & Vanilla Ice Cream Recipes

It’s Ice Cream Week!!!!

This week is all about ice cream, and I present you with Ice Cream Sunday. Kid Two came up with the Sunday idea, and I thought it was cute.

Today we will be celebrating humble vanilla ice cream. Just a note, we are using a new ice cream machine with a built-in compressor, and I’m not a huge fan of it. When I have some extra time, I’ll be exploring other options. If you have an ice cream maker, I highly recommend it for this week’s recipes. The ice cream machine we ended up with was a bit of a disaster. It was only able to mix for half the time because the paddle/blade was frozen to the sides of the bowl and it was no longer able to rotate. Most of our ice creams came out very creamy in some parts while other parts were solid chunks. Depending on how bad it was, I placed the creamy and chunky bits on a plate and let it melt for a while. Once it was soft enough to manipulate, I mixed it all together, and broke apart the large frozen bits, then portioned into containers and put it in the freezer. We did also learn that if we used mix-ins, the machine performed better, as the blade wouldn’t freeze to the side of the bowl.

If you don’t have an ice cream machine, you can freeze some of the ingredients and use a Vitamix, or you can make the liquid mix, freeze it, and return to the freezer every 30 minutes to mix by hand.

Vanilla, it’s timeless and classic, and I really felt that to be able to branch out, we needed to make sure that vanilla had been properly conquered. Obviously, I have no idea what these items taste like, so I’ll be passing along to you what the kids told me about the different variations.

There aren’t too many pictures today, rather, lots of bases you can start with given your particular needs. Each of the recipes yields 1 – 2 pints.

I also want to take a moment to talk about cost. If I were to run the numbers, it’s much cheaper to make the ice cream ourselves, especially the Paleo & GAPs Ice Cream. The ice cream machine was over $200, but I wouldn’t suggest someone in our situation spend anything less simply because having the compressor is like having pure joy. We’ve had the other styles in the past (where you freeze the bowl)… It costs $6.99 to buy So Delicious Vanilla Ice Cream in the store (quart). At home, the milk costs $3.99 for 4 cups, which is enough for us to make 4+ pints. Once you factor in the other ingredients, it’s pushing $6 a batch. However, it’s all organic, and we end up with double the amount for a little less money. If we were to assume that the kids could eat a quart of ice cream a week, and instead we did it ourselves, we would save $452.48 a year. This is calculated as saving $7.99 a week since they can now eat twice as much for only $6. Alternatively, if they eat only the same amount, then we’ve saved $51.48. However, in our house, it’s never that simple because people want flavors, and of course, the dairy eaters want dairy ice cream. To top it all off, Kid Three comes out the winner because with store-bought ice cream, he gets a small small scoop. With homemade Paleo, he gets a normal portion. Store bought Paleo by the way is up to $12 depending on the store. OK, that was a long moment, but hopefully those of you with families that like ice cream and have food allergies can appreciate the savings of having your own machine. We also get to introduce Kid Two to flavors that simply aren’t available as GF DF. OK, I’m done now.

While creating these recipes for Ice Cream Week, we’ve had variations that didn’t turn out so well. It came down to the type of milk, and the extra ingredients. We’ll keep tweaking more milk options to share with you in the future.

On to the items that have worked!

Almond Milk Vanilla Ice Cream Recipe
2 cups Organic Unsweetened Almond Milk
2 TBSP (semi-heaping scoop) Kuzu Starch
1/2 cup Organic Sugar
1/4 tsp Sea Salt
1 TBSP Organic Vanilla Extract
1/8 tsp Guar Gum

Remove 4 TBSP of almond milk and combine with the Kuzu starch. Allow the starch to dissolve. Combine all of the ingredients in a blender or Vitamix and blend. Pour the liquid mix into the ice cream maker.

At the end of the day, I don’t think this mix contains enough fat, as almond milk isn’t as fatty as blending straight almonds and adding less water. Although the end result tasted good, the texture could use a little work. It was more like an ice milk rather than an ice cream. Nonetheless, all of the kids really enjoyed this one. It was their second favorite, beat out by soy.

Quinoa Milk Vanilla Ice Cream Recipe
2.5 cups Quinoa Milk
3/4 cup Organic Sugar
3 TBSP Kuzu starch
1/4 tsp Sea Salt
1/2 tsp Guar Gum
4 tsp Organic Vanilla Extract

Remove 6 TBSP of quinoa milk and combine with the Kuzu starch. Allow the starch to dissolve. Combine all of the ingredients in a blender or Vitamix and blend. Pour the liquid mix into the ice cream maker.

Kid Three was the only one who really liked this mix. The Papa said that if the only type of milk you can have is quinoa milk, then you’ll love it. Kid Two said that because there was sugar involved, it was livable. Interestingly, we also found that this was at its best the first day. The longer it was in the freezer, the less Kid Three liked it.

Paleo & GAPs Cashew Vanilla Ice Cream Recipe
14 tsp Organic Maple Sugar
1 1/3 cup Organic Cashews
1/3 cup Organic Brazil nuts
1.5 tsp Organic Raw Ground Vanilla
1/4 tsp Sea Salt
2 cups Water
2 TBSP Arrowroot (omit for GAPs)

Kid Three appreciated this mix quite a bit. My goal was to make it so that he could eat an entire pint of ice cream without having an issue. He was thrilled. The Papa felt that it wasn’t “sweet enough” but also accepted that it was designed as a low sugar Paleo/GAPs option, and with that in mind, he felt it was good for people who need it.

Honey Oat Milk Vanilla Ice Cream Recipe

2.5 cups Organic Oat Milk
2/3 cup Organic White Sugar
3 TBSP Organic Raw Honey
3 TBSP Organic Kuzu Root Starch
2 TBSP Arrowroot

Remove 6 TBSP of oat milk and combine with the Kuzu starch. Allow the starch to dissolve. Combine all of the ingredients in a blender or Vitamix and blend. Pour the liquid mix into the ice cream maker.

Soy Milk Vanilla Ice Cream Recipe

There are 2 versions because our first one was a bit too much in the container that we have. If you have a large ice cream tub, then by all means, use version one. The rest of us will use version two. It was our first time using the machine, and the manual had been misplaced… don’t get me started. This has been deemed to be the best of the simply vanilla ice creams. I’m convinced it has to do with the overall texture. You’ll also notice that version two has more sugar overall since only liquid was removed. If you’d like to have less sugar, go for it. I found that there was a delicate balance between having ice cream, and a healthy smoothie.

Version 2
2.5 cups Organic Soy Milk, Unsweetened
3 TBSP Kuzu Root Starch
1/4 tsp Sea Salt
3/4 cup Organic Sugar
1 TBSP Organic Vanilla Extract
1/8 tsp Guar Gum

Remove 6 TBSP of the milk and combine with the Kuzu. Allow the starch to dissolve, then mix all of the ingredients together in your blender or Vitamix. Pour into your ice cream machine.

Version 1
3 cups Organic Soy Milk, unsweetened
1 TBSP Kuzu Root Starch
1/4 tsp Sea Salt
3/4 cup Organic Sugar
1 TBSP Organic Vanilla Extract
1/8 tsp Guar Gum

Remove 2 TBSP of the milk and combine with the Kuzu. Allow the starch to dissolve, then mix all of the ingredients together in your blender or Vitamix. Pour into your ice cream machine.

Free and Friendly Foods Ice Cream Sundae

Soy Ice Cream with Organic Banana Slices, SO Delicious Soy Whip, and an Organic Cherry on top. It’s also lightly dusted with raw cacao.

2 Comments to Ice Cream Sundae & Vanilla Ice Cream Recipes

  1. […] now that we’ve covered the vanilla basics, and of course have a chocolate recipe, it’s time for strawberry. By their powers combined, […]

  2. […] ice cream is essentially organic soy milk vanilla ice cream, with the added creme cookies, making it very simple. Here’s a copy of the organic soy milk […]

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